Legal and Constitutional Affairs – November 20, 2014

In Committee from the Senate of Canada

Legal and Constitutional Affairs – November 20, 2014

Senators continue their review of the government’s online crime legislation. Bill C-13 would create a new criminal offence of non-consensual distribution of intimate images and empower a court to order the removal of such images from the Internet. Other measures include increasing police surveillance powers and granting immunity to Internet service providers and telecommunications companies that voluntarily hand over customers’ private data to law enforcement agencies.
Canadian Bar Association representative Tony Paisana presents the association’s suggestions to refine the cyberbullying offence and to improve lawful access provisions to ensure privacy is protected to the maximum extent.
Federal privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien identifies the significant privacy risks associated with the surveillance powers being proposed. The commissioner had raised similar concerns when he testified during the House of Commons committee hearings on the bill.
Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada representatives Fahd Alhattab and Rachel Gouin discuss issues such as the protection of privacy rights and the importance of consulting with youth on cyberybullying legislation.
Basiliki Schinas-Vlasis and Gwyneth Anderson, the co-founders of the Bully Free Community Alliance, express their support of the bill. They also describe the need to follow with a national strategy that would focus on youth mental health and suicide prevention. (November 20, 2014) UPDATE: Bill C-13 received royal assent on December 9.