The Air India Inquiry – May 22, 2007 (Part 3 of 3)

Inquiries on CPAC

The Air India Inquiry – May 22, 2007 (Part 3 of 3)

Commission of Inquiry into the Investigation of the Bombing of Air India Flight 182

Witnesses: Glen Gartshore, Russell Upton

The Commission continues to hear testimony from Glen Gartshore (a former member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) security services division and former supervisor of the so-called “Sikh desk” at the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)). Jacques Shore (Counsel for the Air India Victims’ Families Association) cross-examines Mr. Gartshore on the subject of CSIS’s assumption of responsibility for intelligence gathering in 1984. Mr. Shore also asks about the sharing information between the RCMP and CSIS, the new mandate of CSIS, Mr. Gartshore’s expertise on Sikh extremism, and joint sessions with the RCMP to address the threat posed by Sikh extremism in Canada prior to the bombing of Air India flight 182. Laura Pitcairn, Counsel for the Attorney General of Canada, cross-examines Mr. Gartshore. Commission Lead Counsel Mark J. Freiman asks the witness a brief follow-up question. Russell Upton (a former member of the RCMP’s security service and a former member of CSIS) testifies. Under direct examination by Mr. Freiman, Mr. Upton concedes that, in the early 1980s, CSIS did not have sufficient resources to adequately address the growing threat posed by Sikh extremism in Canada. Mr. Upton discusses various challenges associated with the transition from the RCMP security services division to CSIS, including challenges faced by CSIS in fulfilling its mandate. Commissioner John C. Major asks the witness brief questions about CSIS’s ability to deal with the growing threat of Sikh extremism in 1984 and 1985. Mr. Shore, Carol McCall (Counsel for Air India), and Tracey McCann (Counsel for the Attorney General of Canada) each cross-examine Mr. Upton.